Sunday, 22 Sep 2019

Apsley Gorge

How to grow Dick
Apsley Gorge
- A man with a seven-inch (18 cm) penis may proudly compare his organ to the average man’s five to six inches (12-15 cm) but be intimidated when learning another wields an eight-inch (20 cm) rod.

Apsley Gorge

“Top Walks in Tasmania”

Melanie Ball

     Apsley Gorge . Score a trifecta on this east-coast hinterland bushwalk: waterholes, spectacular dolerite geology and virgin eucalypt forest.

 

Apsley Gorge - photo 1

 Apsley Gorge. Sit quietly in Apsley Gorge and marvel at the power of water and time

Walk.

Apsley Gorge

6km out-and-back
Time required.

Apsley Gorge

2.5 hours plus swimming!
Best time.

Apsley Gorge

Spring to autumn (winter water can make it impossible to cross the Apsley River to start the walk)
Grade.

Apsley Gorge

Easy–moderate
Environment. Apsley Gorge River, dolerite gorge, swimming holes, eucalypt forest

Best map.

Apsley Gorge

This one
Toilets.

Apsley Gorge

There’s a toilet in the camping area, off the walking track near Apsley Waterhole

Food.

Apsley Gorge

None; there are cafes and a supermarket in Bicheno, 12km east on the coast.

Tips.

Apsley Gorge

In summer months, when the water level is low, it is possible to turn this walk into a loop by returning to the main waterhole via the gorge. There is no designated track or markers and this adventurous and demanding alternative, which takes at least three hours, involves rock-hopping, clambering, multiple gorge crossings and, sometimes, backtracking. It should be planned and not done on the spur of the moment.

Apsley Gorge - photo 2 Apsley Gorge 

      A short drive inland from Bicheno, about two-thirds of the way up Tasmania’s east coast, Douglas-Apsley National Park protects an expanse of dolerite-capped plateau deeply dissected by the boulder-strewn river gorges of the Douglas and Apsley rivers. Many park visitors venture no further than Apsley Waterhole, 500m from the car park, a popular swimming spot at the mouth of Apsley Gorge, but a fairly easy forest walk to the body of the gorge reveals its geological splendour and water’s role in its formation and continual shaping.

     The walk starts from Apsley Gorge car park, 12km west of Bicheno. To get there turn left into Rosedale Road off the Tasman Highway (A3) 5km north of Bicheno and drive 7km to the national park. The final 6km is unsealed and subject to flooding but generally suitable for 2WD vehicles and mountain bikes.

Apsley Gorge - photo 3Apsley Gorge

     Head west from the car park on broad, well-formed gravel track, passing an information bay where you can buy a pay-and-display parks pass if you don’t already have one. The track climbs marginally through open eucalypt forest, with trackside signs identifying some of the trees, including bull oak, blackwood, dogwood, wattle and blue gum.  

     Ignoring the 10-minute loop track on the left, you come to Apsley Waterhole, a broad permanent pool in the Apsley River’s rocky bed. The Douglas and Apsley rivers, from which the park takes its name, are home to the endangered Australian grayling, a native fish that grows to about 30 centimetres. To protect the fish, apply sunscreen well before going swimming, so it has time to soak in and doesn’t pollute the water.

Apsley Gorge - photo 4Apsley Gorge

     Work your way across the riverbed just below the pool. A few steps into the trees on the opposite bank you come to a junction where the Leeaberra Track comes in from the right (see point 1 on map). Named after the Aboriginal word for the Douglas River, which waters the upper half of Douglas-Apsley National Park, the Leeaberra Track runs 28km north–south through the park, traversing eucalypt forest, rainforest and marshlands en route to scenic waterfalls and natural lookouts.

     Keep left for Apsley Gorge on an unformed track marked with yellow arrows. Beginning flat, the track then climbs north-west, away from the river. You gain about 150m altitude over the next kilometre, steeply enough that you might need to catch your breath at the occasional through-tree views of neighbouring hills and blue-gum plantations. If you’re not panting, and the wind is in the right direction, you may hear the sea, 8km east.

Apsley Gorge - photo 5Apsley Gorge

     The track is less than a metre wide this side of the river with a few rocks and the odd exposed root but it’s relatively easy walking and doable in good walking sandals (no need for boots). But beware snakes, particularly in warmer weather. 

     Despite a history of farming, mining, timber felling and animal trapping, Douglas-Apsley National Park protects one of Tasmania’s few tracts of uncleared dry sclerophyll forest and the largest on the state’s east coast. Cutting grass, banksias, bull oaks, grass trees, wattles (acacias), tea tree and native cherry fruit, abound in this attractively scruffy forest. Also called cherry ballart, native cherry trees have distinctive, bright green, fir-like leaves and tiny orange fruit. In spring and summer you will probably see grass trigger plants (a close look at the pink flowers reveals a cocked ‘trigger’ that deposits pollen on unsuspecting insects) and stalks of purple-spotted pink hyacinth orchids. Less flamboyant orchids also grow here.  

    Eucalypts dominate, however; fourteen species have been recorded in Douglas-Apsley National Park, five of them endemic to Tasmania, and it is fun trying to identify the different ones as you continue west and then gently downhill. Among the rough-trunked stringybarks and peppermints stand occasional smoother-trunked beauties peeling to smooth, yellow inner bark.

Apsley Gorge - photo 6

Apsley Gorge

       After a short, flat stretch (see point 2 on map) the track descends gently for a kilometre, then steps steeply down a gully onto the gorge floor amid shallow pools. Note the different coloured pebbles and rocks underfoot as you work your way about 100m downstream (left) to where the riverbed drops several metres. The Apsley River falls over this rocky drop and fills a pool at the foot of a building-block dolerite cliff.

      You can easily lose track of time picnicking and swimming here and exploring the surrounding rocks. Just leave enough time to retrace your steps to the car in daylight. Apsley Gorge.

 

 

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A Four-Inch-Long Penis Is More Than Adequate

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