Thursday, 18 Oct 2018

The basics of boxing

Back uppercut

FOCUS ON YOUR STANCE

Boxing is still one of the most popular sport among men and women. Boxing is a cruel sport and at the same time boxing is exciting .

Boxing is an Olympic contact sport (single combat), in which only punches are allowed and only with special gloves.
The birthplace of modern boxing – England (the beginning of the XVII century). The founder and first boxing champion is considered to be James Figg. Interestingly, before taking up boxing, James was a famous swordsman. Later, he opened the boxing academy and began to train all those who want to practice hand-to-hand combat.

The Olympic discipline of boxing finally became in 1904. The first title was won by John Sullivan.
Of foreign celebrities, keen on boxing, you can note the brightest representative – Charlie Chaplin. He not only regularly attended fights, but also took part in them. And this is not surprising, because before he received worldwide recognition as an actor, Chaplin moonlighted in boxing halls as a sparring partner.

To refute the stereotype that boxing is the lowest intellectual sport, in 2003 a new sports discipline was created combining elements of boxing and chess. By analogy with classical boxing, athletes compete among themselves in different weight groups. Shah-boxing already has its own boxing association and world champions.
Before you throw a punch, make sure you are in the proper stance. Start with your feet hip-width apart. If you are a lefty, step back with your left foot. If you are a rightly, step back with your right foot. Keep a soft bend in your knees and put your “guard up” (elbows in, fists close to your face to protect your smile).

JAB

From boxer’s stance, fully extend your front arm (left arm if you are a rightly, right arm if you are a lefty), turn your shoulder down as if you were pouring out a pitcher of water, hitting the bag with your first two knuckles. Quickly draw it back to start.

The basics of boxing - photo 1
Cross

CROSS

Fully extend your rear arm in front of you; at the same time pivot on your back toe (imagine smashing a bug under your big toe) while rotating the hips. Your back arm is your dominant one. Use its strength while making sure you also draw power from the legs and core.

FRONT HOOK

Bring the elbow of your front arm 90 degrees to your shoulder (picture making a hook shape with the arm). Simultaneously pivot on front toes, bringing hook forward in an arc and sending power through the core and the legs.

The basics of boxing - photo 2
Back hook

BACK HOOK

Use the same movement as your front hook, except with the back arm. Keep elbow high, pivot on back toes, and power through the core and legs.

FRONT UPPERCUT

Lower your center of gravity, keeping elbows tight against the body. Shoot your arms from the hips and drive up underneath the bag as if you were trying to punch someone in the chin. Pivot off the front foot and rotate your core through the punch.

The basics of boxing - photo 3
Back uppercut

BACK UPPERCUT

Use the same movements as you did with your front uppercut, but leading with your back arm.

DUCKS.

These are part of the defensive side of boxing, allowing you to dodge your opponent’s punches.
“Remain in your boxer stance (avoid squaring your hips toward the bag) and stay heavy in those heels, keeping your chest tall and sitting back as if you were sitting in a chair. Come up and squeeze those buns!” Gold says.
COMMON COMBOS
Once you have these six punches, which are the building blocks of boxing, you can start stringing them together to make certain combinations. “Boxing is like playing the guitar. There are many ways to make it your own,” says Gold. Here are some of the most frequently used combos.

  1. JAB, CROSS (1-2)
  2. JAB, JAB, CROSS (1-1-2)
  3. JAB, CROSS, FRONT HOOK, CROSS (1-2-3-2)
  4. JAB, CROSS, UPPERCUTS (1-2-5-6)
  5. CROSS, HOOK, CROSS (2-3-2)

POWER PRO TIPS

Amanda Serrano is a pro boxer and current female WBO bantamweight champion. She is also the only female boxer to win world titles in five different divisions. She shares her tips and insight for beginners:
WORK THE BASICS “The most important factors to throwing a perfect punch are practice and patience. When I first started, my trainer would have me practice every punch nonstop for three minutes. I would do one round of just jabs, a round of just hooks, and so on.” Don’t get discouraged if the movements don’t come naturally at first. “I’ve had 34 fights and am just now coming into my own.”
TRUST YOUR TRAINING “When I step into the ring, I let everything go. Once you do that your body takes over and the punches come naturally. I’m not worried about getting hit because I’ve learned how to push forward.”
KEEP GROWING Serrano’s favorite aspect of boxing-aside from winning — is the constant challenge. “I’ve been boxing for 10 years, and I still look forward to going to the gym and learning something new. After every fight, I see what I have to work on and try to improve and grow.”
HONE YOUR FITNESS “Just because you hit hard, that doesn’t automatically make you a great boxer. You could hit hard but have a horrible style and easily get outboxed by your opponent,” says Serrano. Stamina and endurance also play key roles in getting you through a match. “You have to work on cardio. Before I even get to the boxing gym I am running and getting my cardio in,” says Serrano. And don’t be afraid to stand tall in and out of the ring. “Female fighters work just as hard as the guys,” says Serrano. “We don’t care if we break a nail or break a nose. I’m a five-division world champion and I do the same things the men do.”

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3 thoughts on “The basics of boxing

  1. Thank you for your advice. If you have some proposal, please, write to our email-address. Have a nice day. 🙂

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