Sunday, 22 Sep 2019

Bay of Fires

How to grow Dick
Bay of Fires
- A man with a seven-inch (18 cm) penis may proudly compare his organ to the average man’s five to six inches (12-15 cm) but be intimidated when learning another wields an eight-inch (20 cm) rod.

“Top Walks in Tasmania”

Melanie Ball

Bay of Fires

Bay of Fires. White beaches, blue water and orange granite give this easy beach walk a visual punch, making it a walk unlike any other in Tasmania.

Walk. Bay of Fires 8.5–22km return (walk as long as you like!)
Time required. Bay of Fires Between 3 hours and all day (plus swimming, paddling and picnicking time)
Best time. Bay of Fires Sunny day (or stormy, for a shorter, dramatic walk)
Grade. Bay of Fires Easy
Environment. Bay of Fires White sand ocean beach, lichen-covered granite outcrops, coastal heath and lagoons
Best map. Bay of Fires This one
Toilets. Bay of Fires Flushing toilets on Binalong Bay foreshore and pit toilets in Swimcart Lagoon day-use area
Food. Bay of Fires Slim pickings in Binalong Bay; cafes, coffee, restaurants, fast food and a supermarket in St Helen, 11km south-west
Tips. Bay of Fires Take your bathers and a picnic lunch and spend the day soaking up the natural beauty, or pack a tent and camp out overlooking the waves

Bay of Fires - photo 1

 Bay of Fires

     The Bay of Fires, on Tasmania’s north-east coast, was named by English navigator Tobias Furneaux, who saw numerous fires, lit by coastal Aboriginal people, burning along this shore when he captained HMS Adventure up the coast in March 1773. But this stunningly gorgeous region might just as well be named for its signature granite boulders, which are covered in orange lichen and glow like hot coals in early and late sunlight. Bay of Fires.

     The beauty extends for many kilometres, protected within conservation areas, state reserves and Mt William National Park. One of the simplest walking pleasures in the island state is leaving footprints in the white sand and clambering about the low-slung granite outcrops that separate the beaches. Walk for an hour, all day, or even take a tent and camp overnight before heading back. Or spoil yourself with a luxurious four-day guided Bay of Fires Lodge Walk further up the coast. Bay of Fires.

Bay of Fires - photo 2

 Bay of Fires. Signature granite boulders glow like hot coals in early and late sunlight

     The area is of continuing cultural significance to Tasmania’s Aboriginal community, and Aboriginal sites should be respected and left untouched (there are middens in the dunes). 

     The walk described here is on the most accessible stretch of coast, immediately north of the village of Binalong Bay, 11km north-east of St Helens. It starts in the Grants Lagoon day area, a sandy parking spot beside a footbridge in Humbug Point State Reserve. As you come into Binalong Bay look for an unsigned dirt road on the left (see point 1 on map), just after Main Rd swings right, and drive down it about 300m into the reserve. If you reach a grassy picnic area with toilets and parking on the left you have missed the turn. Bay of Fires.

     Cross the footbridge over the serpentine lagoon outlet and follow the sandy track to a junction, taking the right-hand track, with Humbug Hill to the east, its slopes colonised by Binalong Bay houses. Step down onto a beautiful white beach and head left (north) along the sand towards its rocky end, accompanied by a rhythmic wash of waves and passing holiday homes nestled in the dunes. Bay of Fires.

Bay of Fires - photo 3

 Bay of Fires

    A footpad on the land side of the first rocky point (see point 2 on map) leads to a spectacular gulch among the granite. Follow the narrow track going bush from here, which gives rocky and rooty passage through tea tree and she-oaks and around the point to another couple of hundred metres of white beach. 

    The colour of the sand is a product of the granite’s high quartz content. Lichen, a symbiosis between a fungus and an alga, gives the crazed, cracked granite points separating the beaches their distinctive and vibrant orange hue. Bay of Fires. You’ll probably see camps set up in the scrub to your left as you amble along this beach. Behind you is a great view of Binalong Bay township. Bay of Fires.

Bay of Fires - photo 4

Bay of Fires

    Tread the sandy track that clambers over Hill Point to gorgeous Swimcart Beach, a longer sweep of sand, with campsites strung along its edge and a day-use area with toilets tucked back in the scrub. 

    Along here you’ll come to Swimcart Lagoon, on Swimcart Creek, its tannin-stained water contrasting the pale sand through which the creek sometimes breaks to meet the blue ocean. Salmon, flounder, eastern king prawns and black bream inhabit the lagoon, and if you’re really lucky a magnificent white-bellied sea eagle, Australia’s second largest bird of prey, with a wingspan reaching 2m, will pluck a meal from its waters in front of you. Bay of Fires.

Bay of Fires - photo 5

 Bay of Fires

     Continue along the track and explore the next beach (see point 3 on map), over another rocky point, before turning back. If prepared for a long day out, with water, food and sunscreen, you can tread another 7km or so along beach, headland and unsealed road to The Gardens, a place of stunning beauty, with a white-sand bay nestled against a mass of sculpted granite covered in orange lichen. Bay of Fires.

    Also accessible by car, The Gardens was named by Lady Jane Franklin, wife of Sir John Franklin, Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) from 1837 to 1843. Lady Franklin rode her horse here from Georges Bay and found it abloom with wildflowers. If you’re tempted to walk to The Gardens from Binalong Bay just remember that you’ll have to walk back again or arrange a lift. Bay of Fires.

     Packing a tent opens up even more options. Walking another 16km north from The Gardens up the coast puts you on Policeman’s Point at the outlet of Ansons Bay. You can’t cross the outlet and it’s a long walk around this bay, so northward travel on foot stops here. However far you go along this glorious shoreline, look for wooden steps up off the beach (see point 4 on map) as you return to Binalong Bay, near the walk’s end. Leave the beach here and follow a sandy track along a fence line, which is part of a Landcare project, turning left at the next track back to your car. Bay of Fires.

Bay of Fires - photo 6

 Bay of Fires

 

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A Four-Inch-Long Penis Is More Than Adequate

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