Thursday, 15 Nov 2018

Category: Travelling

Anglesey

Anglesey. Family Travel by Bicycle

Anglesey, or Ynys Mon (because three-quarters of the inhabitants speak Welsh), is an island separated from the rest of Wales by a narrow strip of water called the Menai Strait. There are two bridges across it: the Menai Bridge, Thomas Telford’s 1826 suspension bridge, and the slightly newer Britannia Bridge. They both make magnificent entrances […]

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The Cleveland Hills

The Cleveland Hills. Traveling by Bicycle

The Cleveland Hills are the other side of the more famous North Yorkshire Moors. They form a rolling-topped, steep-sided plateau, but unlike their North Yorkshire cousins the Cleveland Hills are less well known and much quieter. Up here you won’t be competing with as many cars out for a spin, even during the summer. Stokesley […]

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Swaledale and Stainmore

Swaledale and Stainmore. Traveling by Bicycle

This ride straddles the Pennine spine of Britain and visits two unique areas: wild and empty Stainmore, and the two most northerly of the Yorkshire Dales, Swaledale and Arkengarthdale. It has some tough climbs, and it visits Britain’s highest pub. Richmond is a great town with every amenity for lovers of the outdoors. It’s a […]

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Milne Bay

Milne Bay. Papua New Guinea

Milne Bay. “Earning my living as an underwater film maker, I found that working with big and potentially dangerous marine animals provided a ready market,” began Stan Waterman. “I focused on sharks, and this allowed me to put my kids through college. While I was initially spurred on by the romance of these big animals, I […]

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The Coaly Tyne. North-East England

They call it the Coaly Tyne, but that only applies to the river from Newcastle, where back in 1530 some canny merchants won the right to ship every scrap of coal from the whole of the north-east through the city. It’s where the saying ‘taking coals to Newcastle’ comes from. The coal industry is gone […]

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