Tuesday, 14 Aug 2018

Skin typology

Skin typology

OUR SKIN CAN generally be classified as one of three skin types: normal, oily, or dry. Beyond this rudimentary understanding of skin types, remember that your skin is an evolving organ, and you should assess it regularly. Having said that, you can understand skin on a basic level by understanding these three categories of skin types.

Normal, oily, and dry skin are the three most generally recognized skin types and can also encompass skin conditions such as sensitive skin, which are not to be confused with the generality of sensitive skin as a skin typology. In chapter 8, I address different skin conditions or “woes,” but these occur outside of the basic skin type descriptions. Please respect that there is no such thing as a consistent skin type and that, just like the seasons, your skin is ever evolving and shedding as it reacts to environmental and internal stimuli. Therefore, when reading these classifications of skin, please note that you may experience all three of them several times throughout your life. I want to impart the importance and effectiveness of caring for your skin while constantly reevaluating its present type. In other words, I really don’t want you to classify your skin in a permanent sense. The healthiest way to beautiful skin is to monitor and assess what your skin type is in the moment and care for it accordingly.

If your skin presents as normal, this means that you have an even, monochromatic skin tone without melasma (evident darker pigmented spots). Normal skin has a healthy hue and minimize pores and responds well to gentle beauty recipes. For instance, care for normal skin includes gentle exfoliation such as my Gentle Exfoliant with sour cream and almond and coconut oils (see this page).

Oily skin presents as shiny, most often in the T-zone, which includes the forehead and the area between the eyebrows, nose, and chin. Marked by larger pore size, oily skin has the tendency to acquire blackheads or whiteheads as the pores become clogged with dirt and oil. Care for oily skin is slightly more involved in terms of cleansing. It’s wise to also follow cleansing with a toner and a lightweight moisturizer to restore pH balance. A great natural beauty recipe for oily skin is my Fruit Acid Exfoliant (this page), which includes naturally antibacterial ingredients such as eucalyptus honey to keep your skin clear. Another great recipe for oily skin is my Clarifying Clay recipe (this page), an intensely clarifying exfoliant. Oily skin, however, is less inclined to wrinkle as compared to normal skin or the next typology of skin, dry skin.

Dry skin presents as rougher to the touch and often appears dull or lackluster. If you are experiencing dry skin, my Brightening Mask (this page) is in order. The natural lime juice provides the brightening action of vitamin C for a radiant glow. Dry skin craves moisture, so be sure to generously moisturize and use sunscreen, as always. Sunscreen is particularly valuable if your skin is drier because the damaging effects of the sun show in the form of fine lines and wrinkles appearing more readily.

Again, I don’t subscribe to the notion of a typology of skin. Although you’re one of our skin.

Our skin is an organ, and it adapts and changes as it copes with internal and skin may at times be oily or dry, you are not sentenced to the phrases oily skin or dry skin or any other terminology that embodies a permanent state of imperfection. So, before you sew that scarlet letter O for “oily” on all your washcloths, let’s understand the continuous evolution external factors. Internal factors include (but are not limited to) hormonal changes, genetic predispositions, and diet. External factors include (but are not limited to) environmental influences, sun damage, toxic stress, weather conditions, sleep deprivation, or bad habits such as smoking or drinking. And so it is that during the winter months your skin may be drier, but that doesn’t mean it will be dry forever, nor is your skin simply dry skin. The useless label is permanent, but your skin is not.

Proper skin care requires your checking in and assessing the current state of your skin. Every 28 days a new epidermal layer is revealed, and your skin should be subject to a new evaluation. As skin typology changes with the seasons, environmental changes, and external factors, it’s important to change how you care for and beautify your skin. There is no “one size fits all” treatment for your skin; just as your skin changes, you have to adapt and evolve your skincare habits in accordance with the specific changes that are naturally occurring in your life. Once-dry skin from the winter season may now be acne prone, oily skin during summertime. During a woman’s menstrual cycle, she may break out with a blemish or a pimple; this is a hormonal change and must be understood as such.

Making beauty recipe adjustments is essential. Moisturize more during times of dryness, clarify more during times of humidity, and brighten more in times of dullness. A simplified natural beauty process that balances your skin is far more beneficial than year-round, chemical-laden products from the beauty counter. Just look in the mirror and “listen to what you see.” There is no need to classify your skin when one day it might be drier or more oily than it is the next. The danger of a rigid beauty routine is that you become programmed; you stop “checking in” with your skin. Then, when an occasion arises where your skin needs immediate, special attention, you will ignore it as though you were on autopilot. Remember, your skin loves attention!

Another crucial point to remember is that your everyday, reliable tool for your skin’s protection and survival is sunscreen. Think of sunscreen as magic cream! This is the only daily form of rigidity that I approve of and, in fact, insist upon. When it comes to using sunscreen, I like to use the phrase “always and forever.” Commitment-phobes are at ease; I promise you that sunscreen will never break your heart!

Nature’s healing methodology requires little help from expensive chemical products. Nature is on our side. My natural beauty recipes and tips translate to the purity of nature in harmony with efficacious results for radiant skin and hair.

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