Tuesday, 11 Dec 2018

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

Top Walks in Tasmania

Melanie Ball

PARK FEES. Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

Fees apply to enter all Tasmanian national parks. Parks passes can be purchased at Parks and Wildlife Service offices, Tasmanian travel centres, on the Spirit of Tasmania ferry, online and at some parks. The Holiday Pass is the best value for interstate and international visitors hiking in more than one park over a two-month period while an annual or two-year pass is recommended for Tasmanians and frequent bushwalkers.

WHAT TO TAKE. Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

To enjoy bushwalking you need to be comfortable – which doesn’t mean you should never push yourself. It’s just that blistered feet, bruised shoulders and clothes that chafe can turn a great walk into a trial – and getting wet and cold or sunburnt and dehydrated can endanger your life. There have been remarkable innovations in outdoor clothing and equipment since Livingstone went tropo in the African jungle and Robert Falcon Scott forced hands into frozen fur gloves in Antarctica. But while it’s fun to flex your credit card on a load of latest gear in adventure stores, you essentially only need walking clothes appropriate for the environment and weather. Never wear cotton, which is cold when wet, in alpine environments, whatever the forecast. You will fall in love with Tasmania!

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks - photo 1

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

Poles. Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

There are traditionalists who hate walking poles and converts who promote them. But poles can aid balance when crossing creeks and ease pressure on knees during descents. Using poles also lessens or prevents the fat fingers that some walkers suffer as a consequence of pack-strapped shoulders; and countless websites claim that walking with poles burns almost half as many calories again as walking without. Poles or not? One or two? It’s up to you. As is how you carry water.

Water. Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

Water is essential on walks longer than an hour in hilly country or in hot weather – but on a short wildflower ramble? Leave your water in the car and discover the joys of going bush empty-handed. In other situations, consider the weather and climate and your drinking habits; some walkers need considerably more than others. If you don’t drink much and have to be reminded/encouraged, a water bladder with tube might be the best option because it enables you to drink small amounts on the move rather than have to stop to pull out a bottle. Consider whether there is water to fill up your bottle en route, or whether you need to take enough for the duration of your walk. Tasmania will impress you!

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks - photo 2

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

Footwear. Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

The last thing you want on a walk is sore feet so footwear should be appropriate for the conditions and comfortable for long periods of time. Closed shoes or boots provide some protection from sticks and stones and a twisted ankle, but walking sandals may be more comfortable in open country or with creek crossings because the water drains out. Some people still reminisce about hiking in Dunlop Volleys while others pull on ‘barefoot shoes’ with individual toes. Whatever you choose it should fit properly, not move around on your feet – thongs/flip flops/jandals are asking for trouble – and be worn in. The road to bushwalking hell is littered with people wearing brand new boots on long hikes. You will never forget Tasmania!

Gear list. Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

The ideal on any walk is to carry as little as is safe.

Moderate walk of a few hours

Daypack with at least 1L of water

Whistle (for attracting attention)

High-energy snack such as muesli bar, nuts or chocolate

Rain- and wind-proof jacket/and or second layer

Sunglasses, sunhat and sunscreen for warm weather

Gloves and beanie for cold weather

Camera

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks - photo 3

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

A map (unless the trail is clearly marked – local tourist maps may be enough)

Half-day, tougher walk

Daypack with at least 1.5L of water

Whistle (for attracting attention)

Lunch and high-energy snack such as muesli bar, nuts or chocolate

Rain- and wind-proof jacket/and or second layer

Sunglasses, sunhat and sunscreen for warm weather

Gloves and beanie for cold weather

Basic first-aid kit – bandages, blister treatments, perhaps some antihistamine

Map, compass and GPS

Camera and phone (turned off for safety)

Full-day, more remote walk

Daypack with at least 2L of water

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks - photo 4

Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

Whistle (for attracting attention)

Lunch and high-energy snacks

Rain- and wind-proof jacket, and second layer; thermals, beanie and gloves if

in alpine environment (even if fine weather is forecast)

Torch and waterproof matches

Full first-aid kit including a foil heat blanket

Compass, map and GPS

Camera

Leave plans of your walk with someone to alert authorities if you don’t return

Phone for safety (turned off to save batteries)

Very remote long walk

All the above, plus a personal locator beacon (PLB). You can hire one from Service Tasmania shops in Hobart, Launceston, Burnie and Devonport (www.parks.tas.gov.au – search ‘EBIRBs’ or phone 1300 135 513).

  •  
    13
    Shares
  • 13
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

2 thoughts on “Tasmania. Tasmanian National Parks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *